Struggling

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Hi all, I recently started the BSD diet because my father wanted to try it and he needed a diet buddy to follow the plan in the book. Being overweight I decided to join him but on day 4 I am seriously struggling! I am following the meal plan to the letter but have found that aside from being expensive and wasteful the food is terrible. I cannot stomach most of it and throw a large portion out or to my pigs (depending on what it contains). To be honest, I have been spoilt with great food but nothing tastes relatively nice. I have looked at the blog and no one seems to be complaining so I am concerned it is just me. If you have advice please let me know as I want to follow the diet but cannot fathom how it is possible at this stage.

  • posted by Harleysmum
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    Hi Nicole1004
    So sorry to hear that you are not enjoying the diet. I have been on the BSD since last September and have lost 12.5 kg. I also enjoy what I eat, which is largely fresh produce without any processed refined foods (and the odd glass of red). I don’t count the calories by the way, so am no where near the 800 a day !!!!
    Please can you share what foods you love to eat? Maybe we can make some suggestions then for substitutions.
    Harley’s Mum

  • posted by Natalie
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    If it’s just the taste of the food (not the amount) that is a problem then you don’t have to go by the recipes in the book. Just make up your own meals based around protein, fat and vegetables with very little carb or starch. 800 calories a day. No sugar, bread, pasta, potato etc. steak or salmon with a salad, stir fry with veges, whatever you like. Your favourite spices and even salt.

    Some people follow all the recipes, some a few, some none at all.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Thank you for the replies,
    I often eat meat and veg, a lot of asian meals including bibimbap and japchae, fish patties, roasts. Not very healthy to be honest but I like changes in my diet and wanted to try something different but tasty. I’m really struggling with these recipes though. I don’t mind the no-carb ploughman, bircher or the warm houlimi salad. Any advice is definitely welcome

  • posted by sunshine-girl
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    Hi Nicole, sorry you are not enjoying the meals on this plan. Maybe you could adjust to your own taste as Natalie says, just use good ingredients and dont eat any starchy carbs. You say you have been spoilt by good food, is that the same food that has made you overweight, is it a very rich diet rather than good food. Tell us what you like to eat and we will make some suggestions. I have discovered I love foods I have hated for years so never eaten them and now rediscovering, like asparagus when it is griddled, aubergine (eggplant) when it is roasted and avocado when it is fresh. Maybe you are still addicted to certain foods and need to give your palate chance to re-educate itself.

    As for the waste, if it is just because you are not finishing your meals there is not much to say on that. If it is because you are having to buy lots of different things for different meals then look at the new thread called Recipe book by Bonkers where I have given lots of ideas for saving on waste and using the freezer for things you might not thing would freeze well.

    Keep in touch and let us know your thoughts.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Hi sunshine-girl,
    I actually really like a lot of healthy food like avocado and asparagus. I think my main problem is that I used to go to the gym 2hours per day every day and my diet hasn’t changed since I moved and stopped my activity.
    The waste for me is because the plan has 1 meal with one item and then totally new ingredients for every other meal, except for a lot of capsicum. I am also in a household with other people and they need to eat as well, but don’t want to follow the diet (my brother is 6ft4 and works manually so a low calorie diet is not feasible for him). I will definintely have a look at the link you recommended, thank you.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Also, I have never been able to eat eggplant, not for want of trying. Maybe I just don’t know how to cook it.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Sunshine-girl, I never knew you could freeze feta 😮 this has definitely helped with not wasting food.
    Just to further elaborate, I like a lot of different foods (no help, I know) and can work with healthy options of unhealthy foods. I don’t really eat cakes, chocolates, lollies or slices but I do enjoy meat and potato (willing to give potato up for the diet).

  • posted by Harleysmum
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    Hi Nicole1004
    I think the crux of your frustration might be that you are following the meal planner. If you stick to the principles of the diet i.e. High quality protein, fresh veggies & salads, dairy & good oils. Then cut out the pasta,potatoes,sugar white rice & flour; you will be able to create a varied diet for yourself without having to throw lots of stuff away. I use loads of eggs… omelettes, scrambled with salmon, just plain boiled for a quick snack or lunch on the go. As for spices… chuck em in!!!!
    I hope you find a version of this diet that works for you, I’m sure that Mike did not intend for the diet to be rigidly prescriptive, which is why so many people have found success with these principles…….

  • posted by Harleysmum
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    PS…. how’s your father getting on?

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Thank you Harleysmum,
    I think you’ve hit the nail on the head and I will look at trying my own plan but following the principles. I enjoy different meals and love to decorate food on a plate it just doesn’t work for my taste. I think if my dad wasn’t interested I would have given up but I’ll defimitely try your tips and attempt week 2.

    My dad is handling it a little bit better than I am but not by much. He’s a little disheartened because he doesn’t enjoy the flavours but he’s perservering (probably because I’m the one that is cooking)

  • posted by JulesMaigret
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    Hi Nicole

    As you like Korean food, have you tried bulgogi (sp?). I make it, omitting the sugar in the marinade and neither me nor my family can taste the difference. I serve it with lettuce leaves as wraps and with a radish salad and plenty of strong kimchi. I’ve also made a fish version which is pretty good too.

    If you come up with a BSD-friendly bibimbap let me know 😉

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Hi JulesMaigret,
    I love bulgogi but haven’t made it in ages, might add it to next weeks plan ;). Your suggestion has definitely got my creative juices flowing. I might have a look at changing a few favourites.

  • posted by sunshine-girl
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    As for your brother, just give him the same as you but with heaps of carbs (if that is what he likes). I make all the same meals but give myself more of the protein and veg (or salad) and let hubby have his rice and pasta and potatoes. Even he has found his tastes have changed and often says no to the stodge. You worry about yourself. I know it is not easy when you are cooking for lots but use the old adage ‘if you dont look after yourself how can you look after others’. Anyway, you are also doing such a good thing by joining your dad and maybe you dont have to be quite so strict, just do your best but keep on keeping on…

  • posted by Esnecca
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    I’ve been on the BSD since August 2016, have lost 120 pounds and have never once made a recipe from the books. The only issue with cooking your own food is unless you have counted calories and carbs before, you probably have little notion of what the counts are in your family favorites. I was astonished to find how much sugar is in onions, for examples.

    Like everyone else noted, the first step is eliminated all white carbs — sugar, wheat, grains, rice, cereals, potatoes — but many other things are as available to you as they ever were. I use My Fitness Pal to look up the nutritional values of everything and have modified my favorite recipes to fit within the 800 calories a day limit. I also have a very low daily carb limit (20 grams or less) because I’m insulin resistant. As long as you plan ahead, you can work it all out. Get a kitchen scale if you don’t have one. Serving sizes cannot be ignored on the BSD.

    Good luck!

  • posted by GrannieAnnie
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    I’m with Sunshine-Girl on this one. We started off cooking different meals but the time and the huge number of pots and pans (!!) made the whole thing a chore, so we now have the same thing but add carbs to the meal for hubby. Even the grandchildren like the recipes and just have different things with them. You can always spice things up a bit by adding more of the flavours you like to quite a few of the meals. As for shopping, Hubby has written a programme so that I go and choose the meals and it prints out a shopping list – even in the right aisles for Aldi!!!!! (Bit geeky, but as he does the shopping and the cooking I’m happy to go with it) … and freezing after bulk cooking saves time as well. You’ll make it work Nicole 1004, one way or the other. All the best.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    sunshine-girl- thank you for the advice. At the moment I think that I will follow the ‘make your own diet’ plan following the BSD.
    Esnecca- WOW 😮 that is an amazing effort. Congratulations and well done on all of the hard work! I haven’t used myfitnesspal before but had a quick look. Are there any recommendations or advice you can give me on planning a diet?
    GrannieAnnie- Rather than Geeky I call it innovative. How do you use this written program?

    Thank you everyone, your advice and information is appreciated and thank you for being a supportive community.

  • posted by Mixnmatch
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    My advice would be to start relatively simply, and work in any more elaborate stuff later. That doesn’t mean bland, spices and flavourings are almost free in calorie terms and turn the most ordinary ingredients into fantastic meals particularly after your taste buds and gut bacteria react to the new diet. I often feel like I am eating a true gourmet diet now I can truly taste everything and the carb fog has lifted. Pick two or three of your current favourite meals. Mine were spaghetti bolognese, chilli con carne and cottage pie, alternative to spaghetti was easy, with courgetti, or there are some konjac noodles available if you really don’t like courgettes. Chilli basically goes with anything, so I usually tray roast cubes of whatever vegetables I fancy with a little olive oil and seasoning, any leftovers make a smashing soup in my soup maker too. Cottage pie I use usually cauliflower but get creative with what I put in that too. If you tell us what your meals are we could maybe give you some ideas about how to adapt them. It gets easier as you go along, I do it almost automatically now.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Thanks mixnmatch. My favourite foods revolve around Asian stir-frys or soups, Pork and lasagne.

    I tried the steak and creme fraíche last night and it was amazing! So happy there was a meal that I really enjoyed.

    Today will be focused on organising a new plan for the new week taking everyone’s advice

  • posted by sunshine-girl
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    Oh Nicole you are in for a treat, Asian stir frys are fantastic for you on this diet as long as you make your own and keep control of what is in them. Pile is the garlic, ginger and veg, throw in the chicken or other meat or tofu then pad it out with beansprouts and more veg with some soy sauce or a little apple juice for a sweet and sour. Soups are also a dream on this, so many recipes. I now make my lasagne using sliced roasted aubergine in place of the pasta sheets and you can still have the meat element, I also have a vegi recipe for lasagne using mushrooms as the main ‘meat’ part of the meal.

  • posted by Esnecca
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    Nicole, I’ve recommended these before but people are generally dubious. Perhaps they might work for you given your Asian food bent. Kelp noodles. ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sea-Tangle-Noodle-Company-Noodles/dp/B00CPQ1C54/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1492955474&sr=8-1& ) As you might have sussed from the name, they are made out of seaweed and are high in fiber. Because of that, the carb count is zero and the calorie count is so low you could eat four 12 oz bags of them without touching the 100 calorie mark. Not that it would be possible to eat that much of them. Fiber is filling.

    They come out of the bag with a crunchy texture, similar to chow mein noodles, and can be broken up and added to salads in that state. I prefer to soften them as use them in dishes like lo mein, ramen, Koren stir-fried noodles and cold noodles. I’ve even used them as spaghetti replacements mainly with creamy sauces (turkey sausage and garlic, red bell pepper with garlic, green onion and blue cheese, mushroom and garlic). They have no flavor of their own, so they just suck up whatever is around them.

    There is a trick to preparing kelp noodles. First you have to rinse them. They come clumped together with a briny fluid in the bag, so they need to be rinsed in a colander and the noodles separated like you’re combing hair. To soften them, fill a large mixing bowl with hot water and add two teaspoons of baking soda. Swirl it with your hand until the baking soda is dissolved. Add the noodles and let them soak for 3 minutes until they relax. You can easily feel and see the difference. Dump them back in the colander and rinse again. Now they’re ready for you to use in whatever you make.

    Here’s my favorite lo mein recipe to give you a departure point.

    8 oz crimini mushrooms, trimmed and sliced
    2 oz snow peas, sliced thinly lengthwise
    2 oz mung bean sprouts
    2 cloves garlic (5 grams), minced
    1 medium green onion (16 grams), white part minced and green tops chopped
    1/2 lb medium or large cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined, then cut in half lengthwise
    1 package (12 oz) kelp noodles
    3 tsp toasted sesame oil
    3 tblsp soy sauce
    1 tblsp hot chili garlic sauce (I use Huy Fong brand which has no sugar, be sure to check the ingredients and nutrition panel before you buy any prepared sauces)
    1 tsp dried ginger or 2 tsps fresh ginger, finely minced

    Combine soy sauce, two teaspoons of the toasted sesame oil, the chili garlic sauce, the ginger, the minced white part of the scallion and one of the minced cloves of garlic in a small bowl. Whisk. Set aside. If you have a low carb thickener (I use a combination of guar and xantham gum which is instantly effective and has no taste whatsoever) add a half teaspoon of it and whisk. Let it sit for five minutes to thicken. This step is entirely optional. I like it because the thicker sauce sticks well to the noodles and is more reminiscent of the texture of dressings you get in restaurants, but it tastes wonderful even without the thickening step.

    Put the last teaspoon of sesame oil in a large pan, heat on medium and sautee the mushrooms. Lightly salt and pepper to help them release their juices. Once they’ve softened a little, add the snow peas and sautee for a couple of minutes. I like them still crunchy with a bit of that delicious raw peapod taste. If you prefer them softer, cook an extra minute or two. Add the garlic and sautee for a minute until fragrant.

    Add the shrimp. I buy them already boiled, but you could use raw. You just have to cook them first and readd once you’ve sauteed the veggies. You only sautee them with the veg for a minute or so to heat up.

    Add the kelp noodles. Add the dressing. Mix everything together in the pan, being sure to distribute the dressing well throughout the noodles. The noodles will change color to the brownish red of the dressing wherever it’s mixed in thoroughly, it’s easy to tell when the sauce is well-distributed.

    Serve topped with chopped green parts of the scallion.

    This can easily feed four, but even counted as two servings, it’s just 250 calories, 6 grams net carbs, 4 grams fiber per serving. It’s a great leftover too because the dressing imbues everything with more flavor while it sits in the fridge. You can use chicken instead of shrimp to bring the calorie count down even further, and you can play with the veggies, using whatever suits you. I’ve made it with baby bok choi, red peppers and bamboo shoots as well.

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    These sound amazing. The aubergine for the lasagne sounds interesting but not too sure if I would like it. I will try to find the kelp noodles when I go shopping tomorrow for groceries, hopefully I can find some in my local Vietnamese grocer. I am still on the diet but have taken everyone’s advice and changed it up which, has helped immensely. So far I have lost 2-3kg and my father has lost 5, so I am very excited! I have also started to recommence my fitness activities, such as weightlifting and running. I am still craving a lot of fatty foods, fried chicken is a major player in my mind, but when we went out to McDonald’s yesterday I only ate a grilled chicken salad (no dressing). If you have any more recipes or ideas I would be grateful, it is a challenge to find nice recipes and I have had some dodgy meals over the last two weeks.

  • posted by Doodledootoo
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    Hi
    I made the red Thai curry last night. Very tasty. Used the recipe as a guideline only as I’ve been doing med style so not counting calories. I’ve lost nearly 2 stone since November. Slow but steady. Just under 1 more to go. I love chilli so make my own recipe omitting the carb accompaniment. We do a lovely med chicken bake with peppers and chorizo etc. Also various curries. I’d suggest like others that you adapt you’re favourite recipes. If you do it once it’s so much easier the next time. I do extra portions for the freezer. Also a very easy chicken pesto with mozzarella. Amazing. Continued success to you!

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    Sounds amazing. Was the red Thai curry in the book? The chicken recipes I can make but my father doesn’t eat any chicken so they’ll have to be a sometimes food. 2 stone is amazing, congratulations. Slow and steady is a great pace, makes a better motivator to not go back to old habits, if you ask me.

  • posted by Doodledootoo
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    Hi. It’s in the recipe book. I don’t think it’s in the original book. I think it’s a pretty standard Thai recipe. I made it with cauliflower rice (baked in the oven) and a green salad on the side. Very filling. I used a chicken breast per person as not counting calories. My husband is not really doing this with me but he just eats what I do and he thought it was pretty filling too and delicious. I just had some pancakes (low carb) with Greek yog and berries for breakfast. I won’t eat again until dinner much later in the day. Weekdays I eat lunch and dinner. Weekends brunch and dinner. I feel that for this to be a lifetime change I need to vary my food and we have been eating really well. We are having low carb pizza tonight as a treat as its a bank holiday weekend with a big Green salad. This way works for me as I said I’m not counting. Might not work for everyone but so far so good. Good luck and it you need any more help with food inspiration put a call out on here. Lots of valuable advice out there. Oh my husband loves the “Hairy Dieters” recipes.I still use those cookbooks and just adapt recipes to be BSD friendly (for us both).

  • posted by Nicole1004
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    It sounds like I’m coming round to yours Doodledootoo! I also think it’s a lifetime change and isn’t as hard as I thought it was, before everyone gave me some advice. To be honest, Thursday was a major struggle for me, I don’t know why (the food was fine that day).
    Also, I had a quick look at the Hairy Dieters and it looks really good.

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