Can anyone do this diet?

We have not checked the qualifications of anyone posting here. If you are have any health related symptoms or concerns, you should contact your doctor who will be able to give you advice specific to your situation.

  • posted by amj12
    on
    permalink

    I thought i read somewhere that anyone with heart problems cannot do this diet, is this true??

  • posted by sunshine-girl
    on
    permalink

    I also read on this forum that there are certain people who should not do such a strict diet as the BSD 800 cals, but I cant find it now. I think it basically said that anyone who has a serious illness should only do this with a doctors support but in that case the diabetics would not be doing a diabetic diet. I get his point, it is very severe and I have spoken to my doctor and he said as long as I dont feel ill, get lightheaded or have hypos I should be okay. I also have to check my BG daily and adjust my medication as, at the beginning, my BG became very low and I was able to reduce some meds. Note: reduce not stop taking as some have done without medical advice. Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns or take a much gentler approach by doing say the 5:2 or the Med diets which allow you to have a less strict plan and still lose weight but at a slower rate.

  • posted by starfish55
    on
    permalink

    I would advise women of reproductive age to be extremely cautious about the fast 800 diet. I was really pleased to drop 3 kgs in the first 10 days following the rules and putting my body into the ‘keto’ stage where energy from fat rather than carbohydrates is burned. I was less pleased when I developed a virus followed by bronchitis (I haven’t been unwell through cold-like symptoms for years). Persevering and believing some of the problem may be due to the ‘keto flu’ which is supposed to pass, I was dismayed when I began to put on weight (while sticking to the 800 calories). I later realised this was due to lemsip cough syrup: the word ‘syrup’ should have been a clue, but I hadn’t realised how this had affected my carb intake until I thought to enter it in my calorie tracking app. I stopped taking anything for my symptoms, stuck to the 800 calories and lost the weight again. Throughout the total three weeks on the diet I suffered constipation, insomnia and intense anxiety: I still persevered due to the miraculous quick results and determination to lose weight. I had successfully followed another diet before, losing 40 kg over a year and a half after the birth of my child; yet this didn’t compare to the quick results offered by the fast 800 diet which seemed too good to be true (as long as you stick to the programme religiously).

    However, the downside of this quick weight loss was the effect on my menstrual cycle. My ovulation pattern – which I track through an app – completely changed and my cycle was delayed. This led to longer and worse PMT which, alongside the insomnia, made my anxiety levels sky rocket to the stage where I started to feel I couldn’t cope. Alongside this I suffered from the ill-effects of hormone imbalance (alongside sleep deprivation) including hot flushes, night sweats and constant, extremely uncomfortable heat in my face. After doing some research on low carb diets it appears that the medical community is split on the issue of low-carb diets and fertility. While some couples undergoing fertility treatment are recommended low-carb diets as they appear to improve the quality of eggs resulting in higher IVF success rates, the diet can also adversely impact on women’s reproductive health.

    Online health articles on the subject report anecdotal evidence which suggests some women lose their cycles completely and that even very young women in their 20s can suffer an early menopause. It is suggested that this is because starchy carbohydrates are important in the production of female hormones, and because women’s fertility is a delicate balancing act: if the body realises it is unable to support a potential life due to severe calorie restriction, the menstrual cycle stops. While it is not clear whether a low carb diet (with a 20% daily ratio of carbs) is good or bad for reproductive health, it is clear that the result either way can be extreme.

    I am concerned that there isn’t enough understanding at present about the way restrictive diets can impact female reproductive health (or male, for that matter), and that the success stories of trials with people reversing diabetes etc. may have been undertaken using cohorts of older people for whom this isn’t an issue, so it has been left undetected. With the NHS trialing the 800 calorie diet for type 2 diabetes patients, the issue of reproductive health needs to be considered – alongside all the benefits that have been reported, as the downside of this diet could be the extreme impact it has on fertility (great for some; terrible for others).

  • posted by Jennie10
    on
    permalink

    Hi starfish55
    I wanted to just say Hi and thanks for taking the time to post this. I’m past the reproductive age so this information doesn’t apply to me but I think it’s always helpful to have feedback about different people’s experiences, whether good or bad. My best wishes to you
    Jennie xx

Please log in or register to post a reply.